3 Bullet Thursday: How about a radical reformer named David Joris

One of my readers read a post on the history of the Baptists where I commented on the Anabaptists.  That reader suggested I  research a man named David Joris who was a reformer (Anabaptist) in the Netherlands, so here it is.

The Impact of the Protestant Reformation in Europe

When Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses on the church door at Wittenberg, the dissatisfaction with the Roman Catholic Church spread like a wildfire throughout Europe.  There seemed to be ‘reformations’ popping up in all of the European populace.  Lengthy postings could be made (even books have been written) on the impact of the Reformation on France and England and Ireland and Spain and Denmark and the rest.  People all over were encountering and then embracing much of the theology of Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, and Menno Simons.  The Protestant Reformation truly was a game changer.  People thought one way about life (especially the church and eternal life) in the late 1400’s and by the late 1500’s they were thinking in a totally new and different way.  There was not a people group that was untouched by the ‘rebellion’ of the Reformation.  One group I would like to write a little bit on today is the Reformation in the Netherlands and especially an Anabaptist bishop named David Joris.

One of the Anabaptist bishops

David Joris was born in Flanders, Belgium around 1501.  He was an accomplished glass painter (some of his paintings still can be seen today). While travelling around in the Netherlands he came in contact with the ideas of Martin Luther.  After listening to stories about the Anabaptists being martyred for their faith (and so being impressed with their dedication to Jesus), in 1533 he was baptized into the Anabaptist Church.  He became so passionate about his beliefs that one day during a gathering of Roman Catholics he adamantly, verbally opposed them.  For this action and rejection of Catholic theology Joris was arrested and for punishment they used a steel ball to bore a hole in his tongue to stop him from preaching and teaching ‘heresy’.

People started listening and following Joris he became an Anabaptist bishop in the city of Delft, Netherlands.  He was regarded by many of his followers (and himself) to be prophet from God.  William R. Estep in his book  The Anabaptist Story says Joris was an extreme inspirationalist, which means he claimed that the Bible was inadequate and therefore needed to be added to by his own ‘inspired’ writings.  For this extreme belief he was disowned by the biblical Anabaptists in 1536.  He was later condemned as a heretic in Delft in 1544 and therefore fled for his life.  Eventually he settled in Basel, Switzerland under an assumed name, that of Johann Van Brugge.  He apparently kept his radical ideas to himself after this time for he died in 1556 and it took the people of the town 3 years to figure out that Johan Van Brugge was in reality David Joris.  So hated was he that once they figured out his true identity they dug up Johann’s body and burned it publicly.

This David Joris was an interesting person who due to his contributions to Anabaptist history in the Netherlands deserves to be studied and examined more closely.

The 3 bullets for David Joris

Here are my 3 takeaways after studying David Joris:

  • He had an unbelievable passion for preaching what he considered the truth of Christianity.

  • He was one of the names in Anabaptist history to be remembered for his contributions to Anabaptists in the Netherlands.

  • He was labeled a heretic by other Anabaptists who judged the idea of him being the ‘next David’ (after King David, and Jesus) and preaching his prophesies to be unbiblical.

 

Is there some favorite person or event in Church history of yours that you would like me to research and write about?  Leave me a comment and let me know.

Good night and God bless!

 

 

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3 Bullet Friday: Timothy Keller

Which person to highlight in contemporary Christianity (2017 America)

There are so many well known Christian leaders and thinkers these days it is difficult to decide on which one to highlight.  As I always do I take some time to ponder the people or events about whom I would like to write.  Many names came to mind, but then I thought I wanted to focus on someone who is around right now (AD 2017).  Even with this I thought of several people who are seen (some I agree with their theology, some I do not) as thought-provoking individuals in Christendom:  John Piper, John MacArthur, Nancy Pearcy, Dallas Willard (although he died just a few years ago), Timothy Keller, N. T. Wright, Max Lucado, Rob Bell, Franklin Graham, Joel Osteen, Billy Graham, Rick Warren, Joyce Meyer, and many others.

So the question is: who do you pick?  I decided that I would write and emphasize Dr. Timothy Keller.

A short biography of Timothy Keller

Dr. Keller was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania in 1950.  He earned his BA from Bucknell University, MDiv from Gordon-Conwell Seminary, and his DMin from Westminster Seminary in Pennsylvania.  In his years at Bucknell he became acquainted with InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, through which Keller became a Christian.  He is interested in urban ministries (sharing the Gospel and discipling new Christian) in the urban areas of large cities.  He and his wife founded Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan in 1989.  Their church has grown into an attendance of 5,000 people per week.  It is a member of the Presbyterian Church in America, which is reformed in its theology.  Dr. Keller is very well known for his pastor’s approach to issues as well as his emphasis on Christian apologetics.  He is the author of several books, among them being:  The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism; Jesus the King; Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering.  

I have not read all of Keller’s books (actually I only read one: The Reason for God, and I own the one on Pain and Suffering but have not read it yet) and was truly impressed with his approach to the topics.  His paradigm is from the perspective of a pastor.  I have read many books and articles discussing some of the major ‘apologetics’ issues, such as the existence of God or the problem of evil, with most of them coming from an academic perspective.  Keller is as academic as most, but uses simple language to express complex issues.  I very much appreciate his pastoral handling of these difficult, yet extremely important subjects.

My 3 bullets for Tim Keller:

  • He writes and preaches about deep theological issues from a pastor’s heart and perspective

  • His time of influence is 2017, so he is dealing with issues current for our time (such as same sex union and suffering)

  • He approach is to address contemporary subjects in a thoughtful and simplistic way, in order for the person who is not schooled in Christian scholarship to understand and ponder.

 

Please let me know what you think of Tim Keller.  Who is a significant Christian to you about whom you would like others to know??

Good Day and God Bless

For What Should I Be Thankful?

It’s Thanksgiving Day 2016 and this is what I am thankful for

As I pondered what to write in this blog I kept coming back to Thanksgiving and what I am thankful for.  I also did a little research on some respected men from church history to see what they thanked God for.  There are so many things for which to be thankful if I stopped to write them all down, I suppose the whole world could not contain the list and explanations of all the things for which I am thankful (I tried to paraphrase John 21:25).  But the point is there are so many things I take for granted every day for which I should be thankful, it seems an insurmountable task to list them all.

Sort of keeping up on the theme of 3 bullet Thursday on this Thanksgiving

I simply decided to tell 3 things for which I am thankful then give you a link to read a short article on a Thanksgiving Day sermon from Jonathan Edwards.  Here are the 3 things for which I am thankful:  Faith, Family, and Friends (although those of you who know me could add a 4th, which would be Food, but that’s another blog post).

  • Faith

  • Family

  • Friends

My faith is extremely important to me.  I tried to thank God daily not only for His love, mercy, and grace but specifically the love that sent His Son to die a horrible death to deal with my sins.  I spend some time every day pondering the mysteries of Christianity.  I attempt to filter all of my life through the lens of God and His world.

My family is another thing that I am thankful for.  I grew up with a Christian mom and dad who tried to instill in me the importance of seeking after and living for the God of the universe.  Also have brothers and a sister with whom God has blessed me.  I enjoy their fellowship and interaction.  My wife is the most wonderful woman on the planet for me.  She keeps me grounded and gives unconditional love.  My 2 children are a blessing who have taught me much about myself and my shortcomings.

My friends are a Godsend that I do not take lightly.  Each of them shows me something to which I should and can aspire: whether it be more study of the Bible, or more passion for family, or more compassion for the needy.  I cherish the times spent in conversation and dialogue.

I could go on and on and on and on and on, but I won’t

As mentioned earlier I could go on about the innumerable blessings God has given me and then ponder a deeper question, which is Why has he blessed me so much, but I will stop here.

A short description of a Thanksgiving sermon by Jonathan Edwards

As I was researching people from church history and what they said about giving thanks, I came across an article from Christianity Today from several years ago that gives a link to a sermon by Jonathan Edwards on Thanksgiving and then summarized the sermon.  I thought this was a very good article so here is the link, enjoy.  http://www.christianitytoday.com/history/2009/november/edwards-ian-thanksgiving.html

For what are you thankful,  let me know.

Be thankful, be very thankful

Good night, and God bless

3 Bullet Monday: William Carey

It’s about time to discuss a missionary

Due to my natural affinity toward theology and scholarship I often neglect discussions of missionaries (unless they are also theologians).  For whatever reason I am not drawn to the significance and impact of missionaries throughout the world.  So in order to rectify this situation I decided to write about a man now known as ‘the father of modern missions’, William Carey.

A poor cobbler and a poor cobbler

William Carey was born in England northwest of London in 1761.  Due to his family’s lower income and a childhood illness he chose to apprentice a shoemaker.  He showed very little aptitude for cobbling but as he grew older and married hoped he could do it well enough to pay for food for his family.  During his time as a shoemaker he was able to teach himself biblical Greek.

A poor teacher

Carey realized that he had an aptitude for languages, teaching himself Greek, Hebrew, Latin and several other languages.  He started a school hoping to inspire students to learn the languages that were so important to himself.  It ended up, however, that he did worse at teaching than he did at shoemaking.

A poor pastor

So he changed occupations once again and became a Particular Baptist pastor.  He succeeded less with pastoring than with teaching.  So William Carey could have been seen (or seen himself) as a failure, but the struggles are not over.

After reading about the exploits of Captain Cook in the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), he had a conviction that the church had an obligation to proclaim the news of Jesus Christ to the unreachable people of the world.  Many of his friends tried to discourage him from going on the mission field because they thought ‘if God’s wants the heathen saved he does not need you’.  Carey replied, “expect great things from God!  Attempt great things for God!” He started a missions agency to send people across the world to share the Gospel, and he went with a doctor friend to India.

A poor missionary?

The journey to India and the subsequent life were very difficult.  The doctor partner of Carey’s left the mission early on, taking all the money.  Personally Carey had one struggle after another:  2 children died, the doctor took off with their funds, he contracted malaria, and his wife battled depression and had to be restrained.  Throughout all of these hard times William Carey said, “I can plod”.  He was convinced of his mission for Jesus yet his efforts were not showing much results, but he kept on plodding away and thousands of lives were changed.  In India he also helped people in the lowest caste system to get them out of their poverty.

“Seventy-six years after William Carey’s death, more than 1,200 missionaries from 160 mission boards met in Edinburgh, England.  By that time, the number of Christian ministers living outside Europe and the Americas had increased more than one thousand percent.” (Christian History Made Easy by Dr. Timothy Jones, page 152).

3 bullets:

  • Father of modern missions – missionary in India

  • Taught himself several (at least 5) languages – so translated the New Testament into 24 native languages of India

  • “I can plod” – kept plodding his way spreading the Gospel, in the midst of much struggle and hardship.

Please give me comments and suggestions for topics.

 

Soli Deo Gloria

 

3 Bullet Saturday: The Council of Nicaea

We need to decide some things about our understanding of God, so let’s call a council and decide these issues.

Since humans are finite and God is infinite we just cannot understand all there is to know about God.  We also cannot have a complete understanding about what we do know concerning God.  For instance, we know God is eternal, but what exactly does it mean for a being to exist and have no beginning or ending.  All we humans have ever dealt with are things having a beginning and an ending.  There are all kinds of ideas about God that throughout history have needed to be wrestled with in order to be as biblical as possible.

2 rules concerning understanding and expressing a difficult theological issue.

When I was attending seminary way back in the dark ages (the 1990’s), I was given many words of advice when it came to wresting with, understanding, and expressing ideas about God.  2 of these were rules by which I filter all my contemplation:  1.  say what the Bible says as clearly as possible, 2. say no more and no less than what the Bible says.  It is imperative that one states the issue and the answer clearly and precisely.  It is equally important to not say anything the Bible does not say.

How does this advice play into the Council of Nicaea?

Honestly I believe that since the beginning (yes, even with the Apostles) the followers of Jesus did not fully understand who he was and were really lost for precise expressions of his uniqueness.  So after the apostles died (the last one was John the Apostle who died around AD 100) the followers of Jesus thought about, debated, and argued about the person of Jesus.  One of the most important issues is: is Jesus fully God or just the highest of all created beings?  Around the year AD 300 a man named Arius had decided he had the answer to the above stated question.  Arius was so tenacious about the biblical teaching that THERE IS ONLY ONE GOD that he was convinced (and convinced a lot of others) that Jesus was the highest of all created beings, yet created nonetheless and therefore not eternal.  Arius made this statement about Jesus: ‘The Son of God was a created being, made from nothing; there was a time when he had no existence and he was capable of change and of altering between good and evil’.  Arius emphasized the oneness of God to the detriment of the threeness of God.  He was not comfortable with the idea that ‘the Father was God, the Son was God, and the Spirit was God, yet there was only one God’.

Emperor Constantine assists in the debate

In AD 325 the Roman Emperor Constantine (no not John Constantine, that’s a TOTALLY different guy) called a council of pastors to meet in the city of Nicaea (in modern day Turkey) to debate the issue of the relationship between the Father and the Son and come to the precise biblical statement.

There is so much that could be said (and probably should be said) about the Council of Nicaea who were the main participants, what they discussed, and the conclusions they came to.  But for our purposes let me just state it as simply as I can, the council’s statement which was put into the Nicene Creed:       We believe . . .

And in one Lord Jesus Christ,
the only Son of God,
begotten from the Father before all ages,
God from God,
Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made;
of the same essence as the Father.

(this is just a portion of the creed, but the portion that is pertinent to our discussion here).

The conclusion from the majority of the pastors is that Jesus is fully God and not a created being.

Here are the 3 bullets for the Council of Nicaea:

  • The council was called by Emperor Constantine to produce a definitive statement about the eternality of Jesus.

  • A man named Arius was condemned by the council to be a heretic because of his unwavering denial of Jesus being of the same essence as the Father

  • The council’s conclusion is that Jesus was begotten not made and of the same essence as the Father.

Please tell me a story of how you wrestled with this issue and what helps you in understanding the person of Jesus.

3 Bullet Thursday (or Monday): Augustine of Hippo

I said it would be difficult to post every Thursday

As I wrote in a previous post, I knew it would be difficult to keep up even a short blog post once a week.  This is one of the things that I am trying to stay consistent with, but you all know that life gets busy.  So bear with me while I struggle through this.  So today’s post is late but I will also try to post another one on Thursday.

Augustine of Hippo (bio):

Born in AD 354 in North Africa (modern day Algeria) his father was a pagan member of the Roman government, and mother was a devout Christian.  He was a brilliant child so his parents sent him to get a good education to a modern city (Carthage) out of his small town with its limited opportunities. He soon became a teacher of rhetoric (debating) and later one of the lead rhetoricians in the Roman Empire.  He had no need of the Bible (it was to pedestrian) but was insatiable in his quest for truth.  He also struggled personally with his own sin, evil, and rebellion.  He began following Jesus Christ while living in Milan, Italy and listening to a charismatic preacher named Ambrose.  After Augustine moved back to his home town to spend the remainder of his life as a monk in contemplation of the things of God, he was coerced into becoming the pastor of a church in Hippo Regius (modern day Annaba, Algeria).  He spent the rest of his life pastoring and writing (in his native Latin) and thinking about theology.  He wrote about many, many topics, among them: salvation, the church, baptism, sin, the Trinity, the Christian state, sex, time, the sovereignty of God.  He debated against many bad philosophies of the day, such as Pelagianism, Manicheism, and the Donatists.

Augustine’s 3 bullet points:

  • Battled Pelagius whose preached the idea that man has the ability to work toward his own salvation (idea summary is “man is a sinner because he sins”).  Augustine fought this preaching by believing, “man sins because he is a sinner”.

  • Wrote On The Trinity which expressed God as an eternal transcendent, infinite, and perfect triune God.

  • Wrote The City of God responding to the destruction of Rome in 410 by the Visigoths, emphasizing God’s sovereignty and providence.

3 Bullet Thursday: Polycarp

Polycarp the Bishop of Smyrna

Polycarp (AD 69-155) was the bishop/pastor of the church in Smyrna (modern day Izmir, Turkey).  According to Eusebius of Caesarea (who wrote the first history of the Christian church around AD 300) he was a disciple of the Apostle John.  Polycarp was well know to have called Marcion, a leader in Gnosticism, ‘the firstborn of Satan’ because of his gnostic theology.  Polycarp was martyred (burned at the stake which did not consume him so he was stabbed with a sword) for his faith in Jesus before a crowd of onlookers in a stadium.

  • Disciple of the Apostle John

  • Wrote against Marcion a well known leader of Gnosticism

  • Martyred for his refusal to deny Jesus

 

Let me know if this is at all beneficial to your understanding of church history.